A photograph of two vigorous steaming vents in the upper Maraunot River of Mount Pinatubo on April 6th, 1991.(Credit: Raymundo Punongbayan/PHIVOLCS)First SignsOn August 3rd, 1990, 2-3 weeks after the 1990 Luzon earthquake that struck Cordillera and devastated many people's livelihoods, ground fracturing and steam emissions were reported by residents of Sitios Tarao and Yamut on the upper slopes of Mount Pinatubo.This event signalled magmatic or hydrothermal activity yet no one thought that this would lead to an eruption at the time.On March 15th, 1991, the Aetas, on the lower north-western flank of Pinatubo, felt earthquakes that could have originated from Mount Pinatubo.Then in the following month of April 2nd, steam explosions, coming from the mountain, were witnessed by many within the tribal community.Two days later on April 4th, Sister Emma Fondevilla of LAKAS reported these explosions to the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (or PHIVOLCS); she also reported felt earthquakes and a strong sulfur odor during and after the explosions.The series of explosions and the strong sulfur odor caused some residents of villages at the northwest, west, and southwest slopes of the volcano to evacuate voluntarily.PHIVOLCS began to become more concerned regarding these reports, but could they trust the accounts of a people who believed in make believe deities living in the mountain?Dr." /> A photograph of two vigorous steaming vents in the upper Maraunot River of Mount Pinatubo on April 6th, 1991.(Credit: Raymundo Punongbayan/PHIVOLCS)First SignsOn August 3rd, 1990, 2-3 weeks after the 1990 Luzon earthquake that struck Cordillera and devastated many people's livelihoods, ground fracturing and steam emissions were reported by residents of Sitios Tarao and Yamut on the upper slopes of Mount Pinatubo.This event signalled magmatic or hydrothermal activity yet no one thought that this would lead to an eruption at the time.On March 15th, 1991, the Aetas, on the lower north-western flank of Pinatubo, felt earthquakes that could have originated from Mount Pinatubo.Then in the following month of April 2nd, steam explosions, coming from the mountain, were witnessed by many within the tribal community.Two days later on April 4th, Sister Emma Fondevilla of LAKAS reported these explosions to the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (or PHIVOLCS); she also reported felt earthquakes and a strong sulfur odor during and after the explosions.The series of explosions and the strong sulfur odor caused some residents of villages at the northwest, west, and southwest slopes of the volcano to evacuate voluntarily.PHIVOLCS began to become more concerned regarding these reports, but could they trust the accounts of a people who believed in make believe deities living in the mountain?Dr." />

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